OTCs 101 Quiz

How much do you know about OTC safe use, storage, and disposal?

The more you know about over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, the more confident you will be that you are making the best choices when caring for yourself or a loved one. Test your OTC knowledge, and see how much you already know about your OTCs.

OTCs 101 Quiz

question 1 of 10

What does OTC stand for?

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Correct! OTC stands for “over-the-counter,” or nonprescription, medicine. These are medicines available without a healthcare provider’s prescription. OTCs must be proven safe and effective by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and must have clear directions for consumers to use them appropriately.

Sorry, that’s incorrect. OTC stands for “over-the-counter,” or nonprescription, medicine. These are medicines available without a healthcare provider’s prescription. OTCs must be proven safe and effective by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and must have clear directions for consumers to use them appropriately.

OTCs 101 Quiz

question 2 of 10

The dosage directions on an OTC label are:

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Correct! OTC medicine dosage directions are instructions that should be followed exactly, unless a healthcare provider specifically tells you otherwise. This means you should never take more of a medicine than the label says, and you should never take a medicine for longer than the label says. While OTC medicines are safe and effective when taken according to the label, no medicine is without risk, and that includes OTC medicines.

Sorry, that’s incorrect. OTC dosage directions are instructions that should be followed exactly, unless a healthcare provider specifically tells you otherwise. This means you should never take more of a medicine than the label says, and you should never take a medicine for longer than the label says. While OTC medicines are safe and effective when taken according to the label, no medicine is without risk, and that includes OTC medicines.

OTCs 101 Quiz

question 3 of 10

If you do not follow the directions on an OTC label, what could happen?

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Correct! You must always use OTC medicines according to their instructions. Taking more of an OTC medicine or for a longer period of time than labeled—unless specifically told to do so by your healthcare provider—could cause health problems.

Sorry, that’s incorrect. You must always use OTC medicines according to their instructions in order to avoid possible health problems, side effects, and long-term damage. OTCs are serious medicines. Taking more of an OTC medicine or for a longer period of time than labeled—unless specifically told to do so by your healthcare provider—could cause health problems.

OTCs 101 Quiz

question 4 of 10

What is the Drug Facts label?

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Correct! The label for OTC medicines is called the Drug Facts label. It is based on rules from the FDA and is found on the back and often the sides of the OTC box or package. The Drug Facts label provides important information about the safe and effective use of an OTC medicine and is written in the same format and order for every medicine. Every OTC Drug Facts label on store shelves has been approved by FDA.

Sorry, that’s incorrect. The label for OTC medicines is called the Drug Facts label. It is based on rules from FDA and is found on the back and often the sides of the OTC box or package. The Drug Facts label provides important information about the safe and effective use of an OTC medicine and is written in the same format and order for every medicine. Every Drug Facts label on store shelves is regulated by FDA.

OTCs 101 Quiz

question 5 of 10

If pregnant, the most important part of the OTC Drug Facts label is:

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Correct! All sections of an OTC Drug Facts label are important, but the warnings section tells you to talk to a healthcare provider before taking a medicine if you are pregnant.

Sorry, that’s incorrect. All sections of an OTC medicine Drug Facts label are important, but the warnings section tells you to talk to a healthcare provider before taking a medicine if you are pregnant.

OTCs 101 Quiz

question 6 of 10

OTC medicines should be stored:

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Correct! Safe use and safekeeping of OTCs are extremely important. Always give medicine according to label directions and store it out of sight and reach of children.

Sorry, that’s incorrect. Safe use and safekeeping of OTCs are extremely important. Always give medicine according to label directions and store it out of sight and reach of children.

OTCs 101 Quiz

question 7 of 10

If giving a child more than one medicine, what section of the Drug Facts label should you pay particular attention to?

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Correct! While every section of the label is important, the active ingredient section is especially important if you are giving a child two or more medicines at the same time. Since OTC and prescription medicines may contain the same active ingredient, check this section of the label to be sure you are not accidentally giving your child too much of the same active ingredient. This is true for any member of the household taking more than one medicine at the same time.

Sorry, that’s incorrect. While every section of the label is important, the active ingredient section is especially important if you are giving a child two or more medicines at the same time. Since OTC and prescription medicines may contain the same active ingredient, check this section of the label to be sure you are not accidentally giving your child too much of the same active ingredient. This is true for any member of the household taking more than one medicine at the same time.

OTCs 101 Quiz

question 8 of 10

Why should you have a healthcare provider do a yearly review of the medicines you take?

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Correct! Healthcare providers such as doctors, nurses, and pharmacists help make sure you are getting the most benefit from your medicines with the least amount of risk from drug interactions and side effects. They can also give you advice on how to make taking your medicines easier, from tips to help you remember to take your medicines to what to do if you are having difficulty swallowing pills. Healthcare providers can also run tests to make sure you still need all the medicines you are taking.

Sorry, that’s incorrect. Healthcare providers such as doctors, nurses, and pharmacists help make sure you are getting the most benefit from your medicines with the least amount of risk from drug interactions and side effects. They can also give you advice on how to make taking your medicines easier, from tips to help you remember to take your medicines to what to do if you are having difficulty swallowing pills. Healthcare providers can also run tests to make sure you still need all the medicines you are taking.

OTCs 101 Quiz

question 9 of 10

True or False: For liquid medicines, it is important to use an exact dosing device.

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Correct! OTC medicines have dosing instructions that specify the exact amount of medicine that should be given for all age groups they are intended to treat. Always read the Drug Facts label and use the dosing device that comes with the medicine. For example, it’s important to use a measured teaspoon, not a common kitchen teaspoon, to ensure the proper amount of medicine is being given. For more help, please note the following abbreviations:
TSP = teaspoon
TBSP = tablespoon
mL = milliliter

Sorry, that’s incorrect. OTC medicines have dosing instructions that specify the exact amount of medicine that should be given for all age groups they are intended to treat. Always read the Drug Facts label and use the dosing device that comes with the medicine. For example, it’s important to use a measured teaspoon, not a common kitchen teaspoon, to ensure the proper amount of medicine is being given. For more help, please note the following abbreviations:
TSP = teaspoon
TBSP = tablespoon
mL = milliliter

OTCs 101 Quiz

question 10 of 10

How do I dispose of my medicines safely at home?

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To ensure the medicines you take are both safe and effective, keep an eye on the expiration dates and safely dispose of any expired or unwanted medicines. Follow these simple steps from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to dispose of OTCs in your household trash: 1) Mix medicines (do not crush tablets or capsules) with an unpalatable substance such as kitty litter or used coffee grounds; 2) Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag; and 3) Throw the container in your household trash.

Sorry, that’s incorrect. To ensure the medicines you take are both safe and effective, keep an eye on the expiration dates and safely dispose of any expired or unwanted medicines. Follow these simple steps from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to dispose of OTCs in your household trash: 1) Mix medicines (do not crush tablets or capsules) with an unpalatable substance such as kitty litter or used coffee grounds; 2) Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag; and 3) Throw the container in your household trash.

OTCs 101 Quiz

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